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The Best Luxury Hotels in London 2018 (Rated by The Telegraph)

by Fitzroy of London

London does Grande Dame hotels better than perhaps any other great capital (although Paris would demur) and they have never been on better form, all of them now having been either comprehensively restored (such as The Savoy and The Connaught) or thoroughly embellished and brought up to date. Only one (The Goring) is still in the hands of the same family that opened it, but all these hotels retain, if not all, then a great deal of the personality that defined them when they first opened their doors in Victorian and Edwardian days, when these flamboyant palaces first made their mark in society and the life of London.

 

The Savoy,

Covent Garden, London

Telegraph Rating – 8/10.

The Savoy Hotel is set back from the busy Strand and above the river on an island between two busy roads. The style is Edwardian on the river side – see the famous lacquer-and-glit Red Lift – Art Deco on the Strand side, where Gordon Ramsay has reopened the Savoy Grill.

 

The Dorchester,

Hyde Park, London

Telegraph Rating – 7/10.

Housed in a landmark Art Décor building dating from 1931 and facing its own tree-filled green, The Dorchester looks like a great ocean going liner, and stands on one of the most prestigious thoroughfares in London, Park Lane.

 

Brown’s Hotel

Mayfair, London

Telegraph Rating – 8/10.

Brown’s consists of 11 townhouses occupying two parallel streets off Piccadilly. Founded 175 years ago by the former valet to Lord Byron, it was a favourite of Agatha Christie and it was where Rudyard Kipling completed The Jungle Book. Redecorated in 2005, the dark mahogany panelling and fittings on the ground floor were retained, but modern furnishings and notable modern art was added.

 

The Ritz London

Mayfair, London

Telegraph Rating: 9/10.

The Long Gallery and Palm Court are ravishing and the dining room is one of the nicest in Europe. From the doormen with their white gloves tucked into their epaulettes and the pair of bellhops who open the double doors to every arriving guest to the chambermaids in their pinnies and caps, the service is faultless.

 

The Langham

Marylebone, London

Telegraph Rating: 8/10.

The Langham is currently one of London’s finest hotels and is now in the hands of hoteliers from Hong Kong. Once you get over the fact that there is absolutely nothing British about the way the Langham now looks, you realise that the new quasi-Oriental slant is really very welcomed and well executed. The hotel’s restaurant, Landau is a beautiful oval room designed by David Collins.

 

The Connaught

Mayfair, London

Telegraph Rating: 9/10.

Seven years after it was reopened after major and very necessary restoration, The Connaught feels right, a successful mix of traditional and contemporary. The staircase makes the place, of course, and the shoe-shine chair on the first landing shows how tradition is still important with service at its core. Of the 119 rooms, 30 are in the new wing: contemporary and slightly oriental in feel, with Japanese Toto heated seat/bidet loos.

 

Mandarin Oriental

Hyde Park, London

Telegraph Rating: 8/10.

The Mandarin Oriental backs on to Hyde Park itself, with a welcome new outdoor terrace. Decorated part Edwardian, part contemporary with corridors and bedrooms are so deeply traditional in decoration. A fun fact – it was here, in the dreamy ballroom, in the 1930’s where the Queen and Princess Margaret learned to dance.

 

The Lanesborough

Hyde Park, London

Telegraph Rating – 9/10.

Beginning life as an elegant country house for Viscount Lanesborough in 1719, the Lanesborough was rebuilt in 1827 as St George’s Hospital and only became a hotel in 1990. Perhaps this newness is what has given it probably the most cosmopolitan feel of all London’s Grande Dame hotel, helped by its location overlooking the ever-busy Hyde Park.

 

Claridge’s

Mayfair, London

Telegraph Rating – 9/10.

Claridge’s hotel is a legendary bolthole for kings and queens and is now more frequented by those in search of British pomp with a modern twist. Reminders of a more dignified age include the wrought-iron lift with its comfy seat and uniformed attendant.

 

The Goring

Belgravia, London

Telegraph Rating – 9/10.

Located across the road from Buckingham Palace. The hotel has the great advantage of a huge private garden, surrounded by flower borders and shrubbery, with a central lawn on which croquet is played in the summer months. The recent renovation unveiled its ravishing new Front Hall, clad with hand-painted wallpaper of exotic animals. Many rooms have been designed by Russell Sage and the bedrooms are glamorous yet homely, decorated with Gainsborough silks on the walls.

 

Fitzroy of London thank The Telegraph for this interesting read.

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